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ZOOM Command & Conquer
Red Alert
9.95 (Win95/Win98) (Jewel Case) (REDALERTPJ)

Westwood Studios / Virgin

Game

Ratings:

5 stars from ComputerLife

9 out of 10 & 1997 bootie Award: Best Strategy Game from boot Magazine

91% from PC Gamer

Surrender Is Not an Option

Dark experiments have permanently altered time. Or have they? Now, Soviet tanks crush city after city while Allied cruisers shell bases. Spies lurk, land mines wait, and strange new technologies aid both sides in their struggle for ultimate control.

Command & Conquer: Red Alert gives you the opportunity to be more devious, cunning and ruthless than-ever before. Easy to play and highly addictive, Red Alert puts the fate of the world in your hands!

Super VGA Graphics intensify realism and excitement

Multiplayer features include Internet Head-to-Head and 8 player IPX

Fight over land, sea and air. Thirty new units and structures to choose from including MIGS, spies, destroyers, submarines and more.

Internet access tonight! Play against competitors across the world with Westwood Chat.

Award-winning soundtrack with over 35 original scores

Create and trade battle maps with new terrain editor

Two CDs- one for you and one to lend to your favorite victim

Over 40 missions to play and dozens of multiplayer maps

Three game difficulty settings

Now battle maps are twice as large

Dozens of close-ups and action movies

Requirements:

MS-DOS or higher, 486/66Mhz minimum, 8MB, 30MB hard drive space, double speed CD-ROM drive (300Kb/s), VGA (320x200 pixels, 256 colors), keyboard and 100% Microsoft compatible mouse, Sound Blaster and 100% compatibles, Gravis, Ensoniq, Roland, Pro-Audio Spectrum, and Microsoft Sound System.

Windows 95, Pentium required, 8MB, 30MB hard drive space, double speed CD-ROM drive (300Kb/s), 1 MB local bus Microsoft DirectDraw compatible video card (640x400 or 640x480 pixels in 256 colors), keyboard and 100% Microsoft compatible mouse, Sound blaster, Media Vision, Aztech or any Microsoft DirectSound supported card.

Reviews:

ComputerLife, February 1997

"It's a brutal Russian-front winter, December of '46. World War II is heating up now, and the European Allies are really giving the Soviets what for on the battlefields. One problem: The Reds have managed to capture Albert Einstein, and you have to get the man and his research back on the blue side of the Curtain before the Commies start teleporting tank battalions behind friendly lines.

"The prequel to 1995's smash Command & Conquer, Westwood Studios' Red Alert is an action-strategy game set in an alternate-history WWII that pits United Europe against a Stalinist Soviet empire. For the uninitiated, Red Alert's gameplay centers on the real-time management of dozens of individual units in the combat zone: foot soldiers, grenadiers, engineers, tanks, jeeps, aircraft, submarines, gun batteries, guard dogs, medics, and the all-important scavenger units, which roam the battlefield more or less autonomously, scooping up fuel and resources to produce wartime revenue. Units are commanded by a click-and-send scheme: One mouse click on a unit selects it, and the next click determines where it moves or what it attacks, repairs, heals, spies on, or avoids.

"This all goes on at once. While six soldiers you've sent to scout out the enemy lines are in transit, you might be busy constructing barracks, sending medics to tend to wounded soldiers (an option glaringly AWOL from the first game), or quietly amassing a nice little army of riflemen to charge the gun battery that's been giving you so much trouble. Meanwhile, your six scouts have died miserably - the first two having been disemboweled by guard dogs, the other four having been flash-fried by electricity hurled from a massive Tesla coil emplacement. And as you're searching the screen wondering what the heck happened to all your scouts, you can't even see the squadron of jets streaking toward your clumped-up command post and gearing up to pound it into raw bratwurst. Hello and do svidanya.

"If you've never played the original Command & Conquer, take heart, comrade. The across-the-board improvements on the original game, the sheer weirdness of the retro-high-tech alternate reality, and the option to simultaneously play up to eight networked opponents (or six artificial intelligence opponents) make Command & Conquer: Red Alert an excellent value for your gaming rubel -er, dollar."

boot, February 1997

"Red Alert is the sequel to Command & Conquer, but its parallel universe storyline is just as compelling. Albert Einstein has changed the course of history by going back in time and killing Adolf Hitler. As a result, Hitler never invades Europe, and the Russians (under Joseph Stalin), march across the continent. The Cold War isn't over, just defrosted.

"While based on the C & C game engine, Red Alert boasts far superior AI and SVGA graphics. The computer now builds and maintains its own bases, as opposed to the original C & C's premade bases. Your computer opponent has also grown battle savvy. For example, in the original game, if a tank came across a barrier it would immediately look for a new route. In Red Alert, the tank tries to blast through the barrier, and only looks for a new route as a last resort."

"Red Alert is a feast for the senses, taking advantage of Microsoft's DirectX. Played on systems as low as a P90, the game runs at 15fps in 256 colors at 640x480. The game's superb digital audio will keep troop morale high. Play the Soviet side and a spy with Sean Connery's distinct brogue will bellow 'For king and country!' when he blows up your base."

"Red Alert isn't a huge leap in originality over its predecessor. But like the original classic, it is utterly engrossing."



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