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ZOOM Curse of Monkey Island
Sold Out (Win95/98/Me/XP) (DVD Case) (MONKEYISPJ)
On other systems you can use ScummVM to run this.

LucasArts Entertainment Company

Game

Ratings:

95% from PC Gamer - Editor's Choice

PC Gamer - 1997 Best Adventure Game

What's Sharper, Your Sword or Your Wit?

I've sailed the seas from Trinidad to Tortuga and I've never seen anything like it! The engagement ring I gave Elaine has a terrible pirate curse on it. LeChuck is behind it, I'm sure. I should have known that nothing good could come out of that evil zombie's treasures. And if that's not bad enough, the clairvoyant I met in the mangrove swamp told me that if I am to break the curse and save Elaine, I will have to die! - Excerpted from "The Memoirs of Guybrush Threepwood: The Monkey Island Years"

Quick - what has dozens of monkeys, ghost pirates galore and more insults than a cranky parrot? Why, The Curse of Monkey Island, of course! In this highly anticipated third installment to LucasArts' popular Monkey Island series of graphic adventures, Guybrush Threepwood once again takes up dull blade and rapier wit against the nefarious demon-pirate LeChuck. In Curse, Guybrush must save his one true love, Elaine Marley, from being turned into the evil pirate's zombie bride. But, hoping to marry Elaine himself, Guybrush unknowingly slips a cursed ring onto her finger that transforms her into a gold statue. He must then find a way to change Elaine back to her beautiful self and stop LeChuck from carrying out his sinister plans. Aye, 'tis a rollicking piratey adventure that's sure to challenge the mind and shiver a few timbers!

Third in the legendary Monkey Island series of graphic adventures

Film quality animation, voice, sound and music - the undead come to life before your very eyes

Incredible high-resolution (640x480) graphics

A barrel of gameplay - estimated 30-plus hours

Two difficulty settings: regular and Mega-Monkey (now with more puzzley goodness)

New and improved insults suitable for swordfights and other fun occasions

A graphic adventure by Jonathan Ackley and Larry Ahern.

Ahoy, Maties!

Welcome aboard The Curse of Monkey Island! If ye be seeking skulduggery, wenching, violence, and foul language...go to a fraternity party! But if ye be in search of humorous piratey adventure with a hapless hero, a vile villain, perplexing puzzles and more anachronisms than ye can shake a mizzenmast at, then ye have come to the right game! Settle your laptop firmly onto the starboard yardarm, make sure your galley be fully provisioned with nacho-flavored hardtack nibbles, and we'll set sail for fun!

Requirements:

Windows 95/98/Me/XP: 100% Windows DirectX compatible computer, PCI graphics card, Pentium 90 or faster, 16MB RAM, quad speed or faster CD-ROM drive, 100% Windows compatible 16-bit sound card, Microsoft DirectX 5.0 or higher.

Tested OK on Windows XP.

If you can find the original DOS version of this product somewhere just run it under ScummVM. It works better on newer systems under ScummVM that it did under DOS. Highly recommended.

            

The Monkey Island Story

So if this is your first Monkey Island game (or if your memory has been a little spotty since that last alien abduction), you may be asking yourself, "Who is this Threepwood guy, and how did he end up writing his journal in the middle of the Caribbean?" Well, it all started on Mêlée Island.

The Secret of Monkey Island

In the first game, The Secret of Monkey Island, wannabe pirate Guybrush Threepwood showed up on Mêlée Island seeking instruction in his chosen craft of pirating. While passing the pirate entrance exam (treasure hunting, sword fighting, and thievery), Guybrush met the love of his life, Governor Elaine Marley.

Unfortunately, he also ran into his archenemy, the Undead Pirate LeChuck, who had kidnapped Elaine. With the help of the Voodoo Lady and some other friends - like Stan, the obnoxious used galleon salesman - Guybrush defeated LeChuck, scattering his spirit to the Caribbean winds.

Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge

In the next installment, Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge, Guybrush appeared on Scabb Island and became obsessed with hunting for the legendary treasure of Big Whoop.

In the process, he nearly lost the love of the beautiful Elaine and unwittingly aided LeChuck's first mate, Largo LeGrande in the zombie resurrection of the Undead Pirate. Only through the aid of the Voodoo Lady and the myopic cartographer, Wally, was Guybrush able to survive. Nonetheless, Guybrush ended up hexed by LeChuck, believing himself to be a little boy trapped in the Carnival of the Damned.

The Curse of Monkey Island

Now, in The Curse of Monkey Island, somehow Guybrush has escaped and once again found his true love...whose fort is under attack by the forces of the zombie pirate. Can Guybrush defeat LeChuck? Will Elaine take him back? Will Guybrush ever learn the secret of Monkey Island? And how come Guybrush looks so much taller in this game?

The Characters

Guybrush Threepwood - In the first Monkey Island game, wannabe pirate Guybrush Threepwood showed up on Melee Island seeking instruction in his chosen craft. While passing the pirate entrance exam (treasure hunting, swordfighting, and thievery), Guybrush met the love of his life, Governor Elaine Marley. Unfortunately, he also ran into his archenemy, the Ghost Pirate LeChuck, who had kidnapped Elaine. With the help of the Voodoo Lady and some other friends (like Stan, the obnoxious used galleon salesman), Guybrush defeated LeChuck, scattering his spirit to the Caribbean winds.

Elaine Marley - Popular governor of several Caribbean islands (including Melee, Scabb, and Plunder), Elaine grew up around pirates and is more than capable of taking care of herself. Although frequently courted by the Ghost Pirate LeChuck, Elaine's sole love interest (however sporadic), has always been Guybrush, whom she loves for his incompetence.

Le Chuck - The Ghost Pirate's principal problems are that he can't stay dead and he can't get over Elaine. Add to that a perpetual hygiene problem and a love of sadistic torture, and you'll understand why MGM never made a musical about his life.



Reviews:

Computer Shopper, April 1998

"The purveyors of digital mirth at LucasArts hit the funny bone again with The Curse of Monkey Island, the long-awaited third episode in the classic pun- and puzzle-filled pirate saga. Boasting a new 32-bit engine, high-resolution graphics, and excellent voice acting, this latest laughfest is LucasArts' cleverest to date."

"Most of the central characters from the original two games make a triumphant return here, including bumbling hero Guybrush Threepwood, his heartthrob Elaine, and the evil pirate LeChuck, who is back from the dead and loving it...."

"The game offers two distinct modes of play: standard mode for beginners, and Mega-Monkey, which follows the same plot threads, but features more difficult puzzles. Most puzzles involve combining items in your inventory with other objects in ways that are usually logical, albeit silly and twisted. The puzzles are as clever as their solutions are rewarding, though not as demanding overall as those in the last installment.

"The voice-overs are professional and spirited, and aided by a side-splitting script so hip it hurts. There are even moments of arcade-style action, including ship-to-ship combat and sword fights where contestants thrust insults, not blades.

"Barely contained onto two CDs, The Curse of Monkey Island is a big game, capable of giving even experienced swashbucklers at least 40 hours of rib-tickling, head-scratching fun. In an age of oh-so-serious strategy and malevolent action genres, this is a welcome diversion indeed."



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